sub-liminal
sub-liminal
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likeafieldmouse:

John Singer Sargent - The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit (1882)
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experimentsinmotion:

Found Typologies: Bernd and Hilla Becher’s Photographs of Industrial Architecture
German conceptual artists Bernhard “Bernd” Becher and Hilla Becher, who worked together as a collaborative duo, are perhaps best known for their extensive series of photographic images of industrial buildings and structures. The images were often organized in grids according to a particular “typology,” such as water towers, grain elevators, coke ovens, and warehouses. In displaying what might typically be considered “banal” or lacking in design, the Becher’s elevated industrial architecture to subject worthy of formal aesthetic and artistic consideration. The photographs also bring light to an architectural ecosystem based on the production and transformation of energy that is paradoxically both hidden and ubiquitous. The Bechers would go on to influence generations of documentary photographers and artists as the founders of what has come to be known as the ‘Becher school.’
experimentsinmotion:

Found Typologies: Bernd and Hilla Becher’s Photographs of Industrial Architecture
German conceptual artists Bernhard “Bernd” Becher and Hilla Becher, who worked together as a collaborative duo, are perhaps best known for their extensive series of photographic images of industrial buildings and structures. The images were often organized in grids according to a particular “typology,” such as water towers, grain elevators, coke ovens, and warehouses. In displaying what might typically be considered “banal” or lacking in design, the Becher’s elevated industrial architecture to subject worthy of formal aesthetic and artistic consideration. The photographs also bring light to an architectural ecosystem based on the production and transformation of energy that is paradoxically both hidden and ubiquitous. The Bechers would go on to influence generations of documentary photographers and artists as the founders of what has come to be known as the ‘Becher school.’
experimentsinmotion:

Found Typologies: Bernd and Hilla Becher’s Photographs of Industrial Architecture
German conceptual artists Bernhard “Bernd” Becher and Hilla Becher, who worked together as a collaborative duo, are perhaps best known for their extensive series of photographic images of industrial buildings and structures. The images were often organized in grids according to a particular “typology,” such as water towers, grain elevators, coke ovens, and warehouses. In displaying what might typically be considered “banal” or lacking in design, the Becher’s elevated industrial architecture to subject worthy of formal aesthetic and artistic consideration. The photographs also bring light to an architectural ecosystem based on the production and transformation of energy that is paradoxically both hidden and ubiquitous. The Bechers would go on to influence generations of documentary photographers and artists as the founders of what has come to be known as the ‘Becher school.’
experimentsinmotion:

Found Typologies: Bernd and Hilla Becher’s Photographs of Industrial Architecture
German conceptual artists Bernhard “Bernd” Becher and Hilla Becher, who worked together as a collaborative duo, are perhaps best known for their extensive series of photographic images of industrial buildings and structures. The images were often organized in grids according to a particular “typology,” such as water towers, grain elevators, coke ovens, and warehouses. In displaying what might typically be considered “banal” or lacking in design, the Becher’s elevated industrial architecture to subject worthy of formal aesthetic and artistic consideration. The photographs also bring light to an architectural ecosystem based on the production and transformation of energy that is paradoxically both hidden and ubiquitous. The Bechers would go on to influence generations of documentary photographers and artists as the founders of what has come to be known as the ‘Becher school.’
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nevver:

Hang on to yourself
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nevver:

Time lapse, Panama Canal
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nevver:

Journey to the Center of the Earth
nevver:

Journey to the Center of the Earth
nevver:

Journey to the Center of the Earth
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nonconcept:

"Werkstatt Munich" Atelier.
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nevver:

Glimmer, Philip Barlow
nevver:

Glimmer, Philip Barlow
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Glimmer, Philip Barlow
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Glimmer, Philip Barlow
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Glimmer, Philip Barlow
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Curve descent pattern by After-formThis series of prints I made during my experimentation with code. I used “Gradient descent” and “Marching Cubes” algorithms. First, I created a mesh in rhino with a script. Then render the model in 3ds max. Then a bit of color correction in Photoshop. In massive series i combine lines and isosurfaces. In minimal series i decided to show only isosurfaces.
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nevver:

Splish, Gustavo Silva Nuñez
nevver:

Splish, Gustavo Silva Nuñez
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Splish, Gustavo Silva Nuñez
nevver:

Splish, Gustavo Silva Nuñez
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architizer:

This is how you save a Louis Kahn masterpiece. Read more.
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nevver:

Drawings, Paul Chiappe
nevver:

Drawings, Paul Chiappe
nevver:

Drawings, Paul Chiappe
nevver:

Drawings, Paul Chiappe
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experimentsinmotion:

Dreams of Plastic: Monsanto House of the Future at Disneyland
Sponsored by the now notorious Monsanto Company, the “House of the Future” embraced a vision of suburban living where plastic reigned. Indeed, everything from the building shell and flooring to the sinks and dishes were made from plastic. Featured at the Disneyland in Anaheim, California from 1957 to 1967, the model home was designed and engineered jointly by Monsanto, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Walt Disney Imagineering. The retro-futuristic curved structure was made of fiberglass modular components that were assembled on-site. Visitors were offered a tour of the home, where they could experience what the world would be like in the future—1986, to be exact. Though Monsanto overestimated our reliance on plastic, the design anticipated our use of plastic tableware and easy-to-clean flooring, along with household appliances like microwave ovens. The house saw over 435,000 visitors within the first six weeks of opening, and ultimately saw over 20 million visitors before being closed. Notably, the building was so sturdy that demolition crews failed to destroy the house using wrecking balls, torches, chainsaws and jackhammers. It was ultimately demolished by using choker chains to crush it into smaller parts, though the reinforced polyester structure was so strong that the half-inch steel bolts used to mount it to its foundation broke before the structure itself did. Despite it short existence for just ten years, the Monsanto House of the Future left a strong cultural legacy, influencing popular perceptions of value, lifestyle, and consumption. 
experimentsinmotion:

Dreams of Plastic: Monsanto House of the Future at Disneyland
Sponsored by the now notorious Monsanto Company, the “House of the Future” embraced a vision of suburban living where plastic reigned. Indeed, everything from the building shell and flooring to the sinks and dishes were made from plastic. Featured at the Disneyland in Anaheim, California from 1957 to 1967, the model home was designed and engineered jointly by Monsanto, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Walt Disney Imagineering. The retro-futuristic curved structure was made of fiberglass modular components that were assembled on-site. Visitors were offered a tour of the home, where they could experience what the world would be like in the future—1986, to be exact. Though Monsanto overestimated our reliance on plastic, the design anticipated our use of plastic tableware and easy-to-clean flooring, along with household appliances like microwave ovens. The house saw over 435,000 visitors within the first six weeks of opening, and ultimately saw over 20 million visitors before being closed. Notably, the building was so sturdy that demolition crews failed to destroy the house using wrecking balls, torches, chainsaws and jackhammers. It was ultimately demolished by using choker chains to crush it into smaller parts, though the reinforced polyester structure was so strong that the half-inch steel bolts used to mount it to its foundation broke before the structure itself did. Despite it short existence for just ten years, the Monsanto House of the Future left a strong cultural legacy, influencing popular perceptions of value, lifestyle, and consumption. 
experimentsinmotion:

Dreams of Plastic: Monsanto House of the Future at Disneyland
Sponsored by the now notorious Monsanto Company, the “House of the Future” embraced a vision of suburban living where plastic reigned. Indeed, everything from the building shell and flooring to the sinks and dishes were made from plastic. Featured at the Disneyland in Anaheim, California from 1957 to 1967, the model home was designed and engineered jointly by Monsanto, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Walt Disney Imagineering. The retro-futuristic curved structure was made of fiberglass modular components that were assembled on-site. Visitors were offered a tour of the home, where they could experience what the world would be like in the future—1986, to be exact. Though Monsanto overestimated our reliance on plastic, the design anticipated our use of plastic tableware and easy-to-clean flooring, along with household appliances like microwave ovens. The house saw over 435,000 visitors within the first six weeks of opening, and ultimately saw over 20 million visitors before being closed. Notably, the building was so sturdy that demolition crews failed to destroy the house using wrecking balls, torches, chainsaws and jackhammers. It was ultimately demolished by using choker chains to crush it into smaller parts, though the reinforced polyester structure was so strong that the half-inch steel bolts used to mount it to its foundation broke before the structure itself did. Despite it short existence for just ten years, the Monsanto House of the Future left a strong cultural legacy, influencing popular perceptions of value, lifestyle, and consumption. 
experimentsinmotion:

Dreams of Plastic: Monsanto House of the Future at Disneyland
Sponsored by the now notorious Monsanto Company, the “House of the Future” embraced a vision of suburban living where plastic reigned. Indeed, everything from the building shell and flooring to the sinks and dishes were made from plastic. Featured at the Disneyland in Anaheim, California from 1957 to 1967, the model home was designed and engineered jointly by Monsanto, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Walt Disney Imagineering. The retro-futuristic curved structure was made of fiberglass modular components that were assembled on-site. Visitors were offered a tour of the home, where they could experience what the world would be like in the future—1986, to be exact. Though Monsanto overestimated our reliance on plastic, the design anticipated our use of plastic tableware and easy-to-clean flooring, along with household appliances like microwave ovens. The house saw over 435,000 visitors within the first six weeks of opening, and ultimately saw over 20 million visitors before being closed. Notably, the building was so sturdy that demolition crews failed to destroy the house using wrecking balls, torches, chainsaws and jackhammers. It was ultimately demolished by using choker chains to crush it into smaller parts, though the reinforced polyester structure was so strong that the half-inch steel bolts used to mount it to its foundation broke before the structure itself did. Despite it short existence for just ten years, the Monsanto House of the Future left a strong cultural legacy, influencing popular perceptions of value, lifestyle, and consumption. 
experimentsinmotion:

Dreams of Plastic: Monsanto House of the Future at Disneyland
Sponsored by the now notorious Monsanto Company, the “House of the Future” embraced a vision of suburban living where plastic reigned. Indeed, everything from the building shell and flooring to the sinks and dishes were made from plastic. Featured at the Disneyland in Anaheim, California from 1957 to 1967, the model home was designed and engineered jointly by Monsanto, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Walt Disney Imagineering. The retro-futuristic curved structure was made of fiberglass modular components that were assembled on-site. Visitors were offered a tour of the home, where they could experience what the world would be like in the future—1986, to be exact. Though Monsanto overestimated our reliance on plastic, the design anticipated our use of plastic tableware and easy-to-clean flooring, along with household appliances like microwave ovens. The house saw over 435,000 visitors within the first six weeks of opening, and ultimately saw over 20 million visitors before being closed. Notably, the building was so sturdy that demolition crews failed to destroy the house using wrecking balls, torches, chainsaws and jackhammers. It was ultimately demolished by using choker chains to crush it into smaller parts, though the reinforced polyester structure was so strong that the half-inch steel bolts used to mount it to its foundation broke before the structure itself did. Despite it short existence for just ten years, the Monsanto House of the Future left a strong cultural legacy, influencing popular perceptions of value, lifestyle, and consumption. 
experimentsinmotion:

Dreams of Plastic: Monsanto House of the Future at Disneyland
Sponsored by the now notorious Monsanto Company, the “House of the Future” embraced a vision of suburban living where plastic reigned. Indeed, everything from the building shell and flooring to the sinks and dishes were made from plastic. Featured at the Disneyland in Anaheim, California from 1957 to 1967, the model home was designed and engineered jointly by Monsanto, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Walt Disney Imagineering. The retro-futuristic curved structure was made of fiberglass modular components that were assembled on-site. Visitors were offered a tour of the home, where they could experience what the world would be like in the future—1986, to be exact. Though Monsanto overestimated our reliance on plastic, the design anticipated our use of plastic tableware and easy-to-clean flooring, along with household appliances like microwave ovens. The house saw over 435,000 visitors within the first six weeks of opening, and ultimately saw over 20 million visitors before being closed. Notably, the building was so sturdy that demolition crews failed to destroy the house using wrecking balls, torches, chainsaws and jackhammers. It was ultimately demolished by using choker chains to crush it into smaller parts, though the reinforced polyester structure was so strong that the half-inch steel bolts used to mount it to its foundation broke before the structure itself did. Despite it short existence for just ten years, the Monsanto House of the Future left a strong cultural legacy, influencing popular perceptions of value, lifestyle, and consumption. 
experimentsinmotion:

Dreams of Plastic: Monsanto House of the Future at Disneyland
Sponsored by the now notorious Monsanto Company, the “House of the Future” embraced a vision of suburban living where plastic reigned. Indeed, everything from the building shell and flooring to the sinks and dishes were made from plastic. Featured at the Disneyland in Anaheim, California from 1957 to 1967, the model home was designed and engineered jointly by Monsanto, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Walt Disney Imagineering. The retro-futuristic curved structure was made of fiberglass modular components that were assembled on-site. Visitors were offered a tour of the home, where they could experience what the world would be like in the future—1986, to be exact. Though Monsanto overestimated our reliance on plastic, the design anticipated our use of plastic tableware and easy-to-clean flooring, along with household appliances like microwave ovens. The house saw over 435,000 visitors within the first six weeks of opening, and ultimately saw over 20 million visitors before being closed. Notably, the building was so sturdy that demolition crews failed to destroy the house using wrecking balls, torches, chainsaws and jackhammers. It was ultimately demolished by using choker chains to crush it into smaller parts, though the reinforced polyester structure was so strong that the half-inch steel bolts used to mount it to its foundation broke before the structure itself did. Despite it short existence for just ten years, the Monsanto House of the Future left a strong cultural legacy, influencing popular perceptions of value, lifestyle, and consumption. 
experimentsinmotion:

Dreams of Plastic: Monsanto House of the Future at Disneyland
Sponsored by the now notorious Monsanto Company, the “House of the Future” embraced a vision of suburban living where plastic reigned. Indeed, everything from the building shell and flooring to the sinks and dishes were made from plastic. Featured at the Disneyland in Anaheim, California from 1957 to 1967, the model home was designed and engineered jointly by Monsanto, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Walt Disney Imagineering. The retro-futuristic curved structure was made of fiberglass modular components that were assembled on-site. Visitors were offered a tour of the home, where they could experience what the world would be like in the future—1986, to be exact. Though Monsanto overestimated our reliance on plastic, the design anticipated our use of plastic tableware and easy-to-clean flooring, along with household appliances like microwave ovens. The house saw over 435,000 visitors within the first six weeks of opening, and ultimately saw over 20 million visitors before being closed. Notably, the building was so sturdy that demolition crews failed to destroy the house using wrecking balls, torches, chainsaws and jackhammers. It was ultimately demolished by using choker chains to crush it into smaller parts, though the reinforced polyester structure was so strong that the half-inch steel bolts used to mount it to its foundation broke before the structure itself did. Despite it short existence for just ten years, the Monsanto House of the Future left a strong cultural legacy, influencing popular perceptions of value, lifestyle, and consumption. 
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fastcompany:

theenergyissue:

The Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) Building is the First Fully Algae-Powered Architecture
Operating successfully for over a year, the Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) building in Hamburg, Germany is the first to be fully powered by algae. The building is covered with 0.78-inch thick panels—200 square meters in total—filled with algae from the Elbe River and pumped full of carbon dioxide and nutrients. The panels, which display the bright green algae, are not only aesthetic, but performative. When sunlight hits the “bioreactor” panels, photosynthesis causes the microorganisms to multiply and give off heat. The warmth is then captured for heating water or storing in saline tanks underground, while algae biomass is harvested and dried. It can either be converted to biogas, or used in secondary pharmaceutical and food products. Residents have no heating bills and the building currently reduces overall energy needs by 50%. 

Read More>
fastcompany:

theenergyissue:

The Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) Building is the First Fully Algae-Powered Architecture
Operating successfully for over a year, the Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) building in Hamburg, Germany is the first to be fully powered by algae. The building is covered with 0.78-inch thick panels—200 square meters in total—filled with algae from the Elbe River and pumped full of carbon dioxide and nutrients. The panels, which display the bright green algae, are not only aesthetic, but performative. When sunlight hits the “bioreactor” panels, photosynthesis causes the microorganisms to multiply and give off heat. The warmth is then captured for heating water or storing in saline tanks underground, while algae biomass is harvested and dried. It can either be converted to biogas, or used in secondary pharmaceutical and food products. Residents have no heating bills and the building currently reduces overall energy needs by 50%. 

Read More>
fastcompany:

theenergyissue:

The Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) Building is the First Fully Algae-Powered Architecture
Operating successfully for over a year, the Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) building in Hamburg, Germany is the first to be fully powered by algae. The building is covered with 0.78-inch thick panels—200 square meters in total—filled with algae from the Elbe River and pumped full of carbon dioxide and nutrients. The panels, which display the bright green algae, are not only aesthetic, but performative. When sunlight hits the “bioreactor” panels, photosynthesis causes the microorganisms to multiply and give off heat. The warmth is then captured for heating water or storing in saline tanks underground, while algae biomass is harvested and dried. It can either be converted to biogas, or used in secondary pharmaceutical and food products. Residents have no heating bills and the building currently reduces overall energy needs by 50%. 

Read More>
fastcompany:

theenergyissue:

The Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) Building is the First Fully Algae-Powered Architecture
Operating successfully for over a year, the Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) building in Hamburg, Germany is the first to be fully powered by algae. The building is covered with 0.78-inch thick panels—200 square meters in total—filled with algae from the Elbe River and pumped full of carbon dioxide and nutrients. The panels, which display the bright green algae, are not only aesthetic, but performative. When sunlight hits the “bioreactor” panels, photosynthesis causes the microorganisms to multiply and give off heat. The warmth is then captured for heating water or storing in saline tanks underground, while algae biomass is harvested and dried. It can either be converted to biogas, or used in secondary pharmaceutical and food products. Residents have no heating bills and the building currently reduces overall energy needs by 50%. 

Read More>
fastcompany:

theenergyissue:

The Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) Building is the First Fully Algae-Powered Architecture
Operating successfully for over a year, the Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) building in Hamburg, Germany is the first to be fully powered by algae. The building is covered with 0.78-inch thick panels—200 square meters in total—filled with algae from the Elbe River and pumped full of carbon dioxide and nutrients. The panels, which display the bright green algae, are not only aesthetic, but performative. When sunlight hits the “bioreactor” panels, photosynthesis causes the microorganisms to multiply and give off heat. The warmth is then captured for heating water or storing in saline tanks underground, while algae biomass is harvested and dried. It can either be converted to biogas, or used in secondary pharmaceutical and food products. Residents have no heating bills and the building currently reduces overall energy needs by 50%. 

Read More>
fastcompany:

theenergyissue:

The Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) Building is the First Fully Algae-Powered Architecture
Operating successfully for over a year, the Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) building in Hamburg, Germany is the first to be fully powered by algae. The building is covered with 0.78-inch thick panels—200 square meters in total—filled with algae from the Elbe River and pumped full of carbon dioxide and nutrients. The panels, which display the bright green algae, are not only aesthetic, but performative. When sunlight hits the “bioreactor” panels, photosynthesis causes the microorganisms to multiply and give off heat. The warmth is then captured for heating water or storing in saline tanks underground, while algae biomass is harvested and dried. It can either be converted to biogas, or used in secondary pharmaceutical and food products. Residents have no heating bills and the building currently reduces overall energy needs by 50%. 

Read More>
fastcompany:

theenergyissue:

The Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) Building is the First Fully Algae-Powered Architecture
Operating successfully for over a year, the Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) building in Hamburg, Germany is the first to be fully powered by algae. The building is covered with 0.78-inch thick panels—200 square meters in total—filled with algae from the Elbe River and pumped full of carbon dioxide and nutrients. The panels, which display the bright green algae, are not only aesthetic, but performative. When sunlight hits the “bioreactor” panels, photosynthesis causes the microorganisms to multiply and give off heat. The warmth is then captured for heating water or storing in saline tanks underground, while algae biomass is harvested and dried. It can either be converted to biogas, or used in secondary pharmaceutical and food products. Residents have no heating bills and the building currently reduces overall energy needs by 50%. 

Read More>
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nevver:

Houses of the Holy
nevver:

Houses of the Holy
nevver:

Houses of the Holy
nevver:

Houses of the Holy
nevver:

Houses of the Holy
nevver:

Houses of the Holy
nevver:

Houses of the Holy
nevver:

Houses of the Holy