sub-liminal
sub-liminal
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angrywhistler:

Melinda Matyas
angrywhistler:

Melinda Matyas
+
gif-guy:

http://gifini.com/
+
nevver:

Born on this day, Edgar Degas
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likeafieldmouse:

Marco Cadioli - Squares with Concentric Circles
likeafieldmouse:

Marco Cadioli - Squares with Concentric Circles
likeafieldmouse:

Marco Cadioli - Squares with Concentric Circles
likeafieldmouse:

Marco Cadioli - Squares with Concentric Circles
likeafieldmouse:

Marco Cadioli - Squares with Concentric Circles
likeafieldmouse:

Marco Cadioli - Squares with Concentric Circles
likeafieldmouse:

Marco Cadioli - Squares with Concentric Circles
likeafieldmouse:

Marco Cadioli - Squares with Concentric Circles
likeafieldmouse:

Marco Cadioli - Squares with Concentric Circles
likeafieldmouse:

Marco Cadioli - Squares with Concentric Circles
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nevver:

Alyssa Monks
nevver:

Alyssa Monks
nevver:

Alyssa Monks
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likeafieldmouse:

Giacometti
likeafieldmouse:

Giacometti
likeafieldmouse:

Giacometti
likeafieldmouse:

Giacometti
likeafieldmouse:

Giacometti
likeafieldmouse:

Giacometti
likeafieldmouse:

Giacometti
likeafieldmouse:

Giacometti
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nevver:

Can’t see the forest, there’s too many trees - Daniel Kovalovszky
nevver:

Can’t see the forest, there’s too many trees - Daniel Kovalovszky
nevver:

Can’t see the forest, there’s too many trees - Daniel Kovalovszky
nevver:

Can’t see the forest, there’s too many trees - Daniel Kovalovszky
nevver:

Can’t see the forest, there’s too many trees - Daniel Kovalovszky
nevver:

Can’t see the forest, there’s too many trees - Daniel Kovalovszky
nevver:

Can’t see the forest, there’s too many trees - Daniel Kovalovszky
nevver:

Can’t see the forest, there’s too many trees - Daniel Kovalovszky
nevver:

Can’t see the forest, there’s too many trees - Daniel Kovalovszky
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modelarchitecture:

LI-ZE SOHO Beijing, China, 2013 by steven holl
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nevver:

Paradise lost
nevver:

Paradise lost
nevver:

Paradise lost
nevver:

Paradise lost
nevver:

Paradise lost
nevver:

Paradise lost
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efedra:

The Seed Cathedral by Thomas Heatherwick
This porcupine of a building was in fact the British pavillon at Expo 2010 Shanghai China. Known as the Seed Cathedral, the structure consisted of more than 60,000 transparent rods, each encasing one or more seeds from China’s Kunming Institute of Botany. Famed British designer Thomas Heatherwick conceived the walk-in castle as a fiber-optic celebration of nature, illuminated by sunlight and glow at night while the rods swayed with the breeze. After the expo closed last fall, the castle was dismantled, but its legacy lives on. The rods, each showing life’s potential, were distributed to schools across China and the United Kingdom.
efedra:

The Seed Cathedral by Thomas Heatherwick
This porcupine of a building was in fact the British pavillon at Expo 2010 Shanghai China. Known as the Seed Cathedral, the structure consisted of more than 60,000 transparent rods, each encasing one or more seeds from China’s Kunming Institute of Botany. Famed British designer Thomas Heatherwick conceived the walk-in castle as a fiber-optic celebration of nature, illuminated by sunlight and glow at night while the rods swayed with the breeze. After the expo closed last fall, the castle was dismantled, but its legacy lives on. The rods, each showing life’s potential, were distributed to schools across China and the United Kingdom.
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Porcelain Figures series by photographer Martin Klimas
“From a height of three meters, porcelain figurines are dropped on the ground, and the sound they make when they hit trips the shutter release. The result: razor-sharp images of disturbing beauty—temporary sculptures made visible to the human eye by high-speed photography technology. The porcelain statuette bursting into pieces isn’t what really captures the attention; the fascination lies in the genesis of a dynamic figure that replaces the static pose. In contrast to the inertness of the intact kitsch figurines Klimas started out with, the photographs of their destruction possess a powerfully narrative character.” (text from martin-klimas.de)
Pictures from Juxtapoz Magazine
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki

cross-connect:

Porcelain Figures series by photographer Martin Klimas
“From a height of three meters, porcelain figurines are dropped on the ground, and the sound they make when they hit trips the shutter release. The result: razor-sharp images of disturbing beauty—temporary sculptures made visible to the human eye by high-speed photography technology. The porcelain statuette bursting into pieces isn’t what really captures the attention; the fascination lies in the genesis of a dynamic figure that replaces the static pose. In contrast to the inertness of the intact kitsch figurines Klimas started out with, the photographs of their destruction possess a powerfully narrative character.” (text from martin-klimas.de)
Pictures from Juxtapoz Magazine
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki

cross-connect:

Porcelain Figures series by photographer Martin Klimas
“From a height of three meters, porcelain figurines are dropped on the ground, and the sound they make when they hit trips the shutter release. The result: razor-sharp images of disturbing beauty—temporary sculptures made visible to the human eye by high-speed photography technology. The porcelain statuette bursting into pieces isn’t what really captures the attention; the fascination lies in the genesis of a dynamic figure that replaces the static pose. In contrast to the inertness of the intact kitsch figurines Klimas started out with, the photographs of their destruction possess a powerfully narrative character.” (text from martin-klimas.de)
Pictures from Juxtapoz Magazine
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki

cross-connect:

Porcelain Figures series by photographer Martin Klimas
“From a height of three meters, porcelain figurines are dropped on the ground, and the sound they make when they hit trips the shutter release. The result: razor-sharp images of disturbing beauty—temporary sculptures made visible to the human eye by high-speed photography technology. The porcelain statuette bursting into pieces isn’t what really captures the attention; the fascination lies in the genesis of a dynamic figure that replaces the static pose. In contrast to the inertness of the intact kitsch figurines Klimas started out with, the photographs of their destruction possess a powerfully narrative character.” (text from martin-klimas.de)
Pictures from Juxtapoz Magazine
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki

cross-connect:

Porcelain Figures series by photographer Martin Klimas
“From a height of three meters, porcelain figurines are dropped on the ground, and the sound they make when they hit trips the shutter release. The result: razor-sharp images of disturbing beauty—temporary sculptures made visible to the human eye by high-speed photography technology. The porcelain statuette bursting into pieces isn’t what really captures the attention; the fascination lies in the genesis of a dynamic figure that replaces the static pose. In contrast to the inertness of the intact kitsch figurines Klimas started out with, the photographs of their destruction possess a powerfully narrative character.” (text from martin-klimas.de)
Pictures from Juxtapoz Magazine
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki

cross-connect:

Porcelain Figures series by photographer Martin Klimas
“From a height of three meters, porcelain figurines are dropped on the ground, and the sound they make when they hit trips the shutter release. The result: razor-sharp images of disturbing beauty—temporary sculptures made visible to the human eye by high-speed photography technology. The porcelain statuette bursting into pieces isn’t what really captures the attention; the fascination lies in the genesis of a dynamic figure that replaces the static pose. In contrast to the inertness of the intact kitsch figurines Klimas started out with, the photographs of their destruction possess a powerfully narrative character.” (text from martin-klimas.de)
Pictures from Juxtapoz Magazine
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki

cross-connect:

Porcelain Figures series by photographer Martin Klimas
“From a height of three meters, porcelain figurines are dropped on the ground, and the sound they make when they hit trips the shutter release. The result: razor-sharp images of disturbing beauty—temporary sculptures made visible to the human eye by high-speed photography technology. The porcelain statuette bursting into pieces isn’t what really captures the attention; the fascination lies in the genesis of a dynamic figure that replaces the static pose. In contrast to the inertness of the intact kitsch figurines Klimas started out with, the photographs of their destruction possess a powerfully narrative character.” (text from martin-klimas.de)
Pictures from Juxtapoz Magazine
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki

cross-connect:

Porcelain Figures series by photographer Martin Klimas
“From a height of three meters, porcelain figurines are dropped on the ground, and the sound they make when they hit trips the shutter release. The result: razor-sharp images of disturbing beauty—temporary sculptures made visible to the human eye by high-speed photography technology. The porcelain statuette bursting into pieces isn’t what really captures the attention; the fascination lies in the genesis of a dynamic figure that replaces the static pose. In contrast to the inertness of the intact kitsch figurines Klimas started out with, the photographs of their destruction possess a powerfully narrative character.” (text from martin-klimas.de)
Pictures from Juxtapoz Magazine
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki

cross-connect:

Porcelain Figures series by photographer Martin Klimas
“From a height of three meters, porcelain figurines are dropped on the ground, and the sound they make when they hit trips the shutter release. The result: razor-sharp images of disturbing beauty—temporary sculptures made visible to the human eye by high-speed photography technology. The porcelain statuette bursting into pieces isn’t what really captures the attention; the fascination lies in the genesis of a dynamic figure that replaces the static pose. In contrast to the inertness of the intact kitsch figurines Klimas started out with, the photographs of their destruction possess a powerfully narrative character.” (text from martin-klimas.de)
Pictures from Juxtapoz Magazine
Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki

cross-connect:
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nevver:

Journey to the Center of the Earth
nevver:

Journey to the Center of the Earth
nevver:

Journey to the Center of the Earth
nevver:

Journey to the Center of the Earth
nevver:

Journey to the Center of the Earth
nevver:

Journey to the Center of the Earth
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subtilitas:

Mansilla & Tunon - Leon Auditorium, Leon 2002. Photos (C) Roland Halbe. 
subtilitas:

Mansilla & Tunon - Leon Auditorium, Leon 2002. Photos (C) Roland Halbe. 
subtilitas:

Mansilla & Tunon - Leon Auditorium, Leon 2002. Photos (C) Roland Halbe. 
subtilitas:

Mansilla & Tunon - Leon Auditorium, Leon 2002. Photos (C) Roland Halbe. 
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subtilitas:

Herzog & De Meuron - Rue de Suisses apartments, Paris 2000. Photos (C) Margherita Spiluttini. 
subtilitas:

Herzog & De Meuron - Rue de Suisses apartments, Paris 2000. Photos (C) Margherita Spiluttini. 
subtilitas:

Herzog & De Meuron - Rue de Suisses apartments, Paris 2000. Photos (C) Margherita Spiluttini. 
subtilitas:

Herzog & De Meuron - Rue de Suisses apartments, Paris 2000. Photos (C) Margherita Spiluttini. 
subtilitas:

Herzog & De Meuron - Rue de Suisses apartments, Paris 2000. Photos (C) Margherita Spiluttini. 
subtilitas:

Herzog & De Meuron - Rue de Suisses apartments, Paris 2000. Photos (C) Margherita Spiluttini. 
subtilitas:

Herzog & De Meuron - Rue de Suisses apartments, Paris 2000. Photos (C) Margherita Spiluttini. 
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subtilitas:

Robbrecht en Daem - Boijmans van Beuningen Museum library, Rotterdam 2003. Photos (C) Kristien Daem. 
subtilitas:

Robbrecht en Daem - Boijmans van Beuningen Museum library, Rotterdam 2003. Photos (C) Kristien Daem. 
subtilitas:

Robbrecht en Daem - Boijmans van Beuningen Museum library, Rotterdam 2003. Photos (C) Kristien Daem. 
subtilitas:

Robbrecht en Daem - Boijmans van Beuningen Museum library, Rotterdam 2003. Photos (C) Kristien Daem.